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Apr 30 2015

Fun Facts About Freddie Gray

We have heard plenty about Freddie Gray in light of his death having been used as a pretext for riots. Yet as with Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, some highly salient information about him has not received the attention it deserves. Much of it still awaits confirmation.

One thing we already know for sure is that Gray was not an innocent victim, but a career criminal with a rap sheet a mile long. Only in a society deranged by moonbattery would he be running loose, predictably forcing the police to arrest him yet again. His curriculum vitae:

March 20, 2015: Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance
March 13, 2015: Malicious destruction of property, second-degree assault
January 20, 2015: Fourth-degree burglary, trespassing
January 14, 2015: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute
December 31, 2014: Possession of narcotics with intent to distribute
December 14, 2014: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance
August 31, 2014: Illegal gambling, trespassing
January 25, 2014: Possession of marijuana
September 28, 2013: Distribution of narcotics, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, second-degree assault, second-degree escape
April 13, 2012: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, violation of probation
July 16, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession with intent to distribute
March 28, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
March 14, 2008: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to manufacture and distribute
February 11, 2008: Unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance, possession of a controlled dangerous substance
August 29, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, violation of probation
August 28, 2007: Possession of marijuana
August 23, 2007: False statement to a peace officer, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance
July 16, 2007: Possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, unlawful possession of a controlled dangerous substance (2 counts)

Be careful about sharing this information. When Pittsburgh radio DJ Mike Jax posted Gray’s list of crimes along with the comment “he was pretty busy before he was unjustly killed at the hands of Baltimore P.D.,” he was promptly suspended indefinitely by WAMO:

Jax has apologized for his post, saying it was not his intention to justify Gray’s death, but to highlight that his arrest record does not justify it.

No use groveling, Jax. Disseminators of information that undermines The Narrative are thought criminals who must be punished.

Given the climate of political hysteria that characterizes Hope & Change and the irresponsibility of the establishment media, it will be a while before all the facts regarding Freddie Gray become clear. The official story is that racist police injured Gray’s spine. But it could be that police unknowingly exacerbated an existing injury. He reportedly had spinal and neck surgery shortly before he was arrested. However, this report has been disputed.

It is also possible that Gray injured his own spine:

A prisoner sharing a police transport van with Freddie Gray told investigators that he could hear Gray “banging against the walls” of the vehicle and believed that he “was intentionally trying to injure himself,” according to a police document obtained by The Washington Post.

It is becoming increasingly evident that Gray sustained his injuries in the van, not during his arrest:

An investigation into the death of Baltimore resident Freddie Gray has found no evidence that his fatal injuries were caused during the videotaped arrest and interaction with police officers, according to multiple law enforcement sources.

The sources spoke to ABC7 News after being briefed on the findings of a police report turned over to prosecutors on Thursday as well as preliminary findings made by the medical examiner’s office.

This supports the theory that Gray killed himself.

When the smoke has cleared, we will know more. But by then the media will be whipping up feral mobs over some other dead criminal of politically preferred pigmentation.

freddie-gray-arrest-record
The latest moonbat martyr.

On tips from Mr. Mentalo, Rob E, Steven A, Bodhisattva, Petterssonp, B1bbet, and Varla.



  • Jester
  • Jester
  • rpp618

    Ultimately, as we saw with Mike Brown, Travon Martin and so many others, the truth will not only not matter, it will be actively suppressed. Anyone reporting a true account will met with spittle-saturated screams of “racist”, but nothing else.

  • rpp618

    Ultimately, as we saw with Mike Brown, Travon Martin and so many others, the truth will not only not matter, it will be actively suppressed. Anyone reporting a true account will met with spittle-saturated screams of “racist”, but nothing else.

  • MicahStone

    One shining moment to enjoy over and over again…

  • MicahStone

    One shining moment to enjoy over and over again…

  • BillyBob Bob
  • BillyBobBob the Covfefe Bob
  • Mr. Gray made it his job to sell his narcotic poison to the young people in their neighborhood. Parents there should have run his ass out of town a long time ago. And how about the judicial system? All those convictions and he was back on the street? What ever happened to ‘3 strikes you’re out’ justice?? Not in this liberal hellhole..no-sir-ee

  • Mr. Gray made it his job to sell his narcotic poison to the young people in their neighborhood. Parents there should have run his ass out of town a long time ago. And how about the judicial system? All those convictions and he was back on the street? What ever happened to ‘3 strikes you’re out’ justice?? Not in this liberal hellhole..no-sir-ee

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    Dave, I disagree with you on this one.

    Gray was a petty criminal – fine. Did his crimes warrant the electric chair?

    What the Baltimore PD obviously did is known as “ROUGH RIDING.” Where police put shackled suspects in the backs of police vans where they are unsecured as the officer driving turns the van into a washing machine on spin cycle by making wild accelerations, wild turns and slamming on the brakes repeatedly to “tenderize” a suspect.

    NYPD do this tactic as well and were rounding up men on Staten Island last summer doing the same thing, in addition to beating (breaking a man’s arm) and actually robbing them.

    Gray could have been anyone of us. Maybe not as likely as a repeat drug offender who constantly is arrested, but any of us can end up in police bans especially when quotas are running short.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    Dave, I disagree with you on this one.

    Gray was a petty criminal – fine. Did his crimes warrant the electric chair?

    What the Baltimore PD obviously did is known as “ROUGH RIDING.” Where police put shackled suspects in the backs of police vans where they are unsecured as the officer driving turns the van into a washing machine on spin cycle by making wild accelerations, wild turns and slamming on the brakes repeatedly to “tenderize” a suspect.

    If any of us had an unsecured passenger in a van and went “rough riding with a person in the back that was unseat-belted and caused his death, it is criminally negligent homicide at the very least. Depraved indifference, assault, vehicular homicide and manslaughter as well a slew of driving infractions.

    NYPD do this tactic as well and were rounding up men on Staten Island last summer doing the same thing, in addition to beating (breaking a man’s arm) and actually robbing them.

    Gray could have been anyone of us. Maybe not as likely as a repeat drug offender who constantly is arrested, but any of us can end up in police vans especially when quotas are running short.

  • alohasteve

    BREAKING: Law enforcement sources say Freddie Gray suffered head injury in police transport van – WJLA

    http://commoncts.blogspot.com/2015/04/breaking-law-enforcement-sources-say.html

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    By Associated Press

    April 30, 2015 | 5:41pm

    Modal Trigger

    Photo: AP

    FOLLOW THE STORY

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    Freddie Gray died after head slammed into bolt in police van: report

    Police van carrying Freddie Gray made mystery stop

    Radio DJ suspended over ‘insensitive’ Freddie Gray post

    Protests return in Ferguson for second straight night

    Baltimore mom’s ‘tough love’ praised by pastorSEE ALL 34 STORIES

    BALTIMORE — The highest-ranking Baltimore police officer in the arrest that led to Freddie Gray’s death was hospitalized in April 2012 over mental health concerns for an unknown duration and had his guns confiscated by local sheriff’s deputies, according to records from the sheriff’s office and court obtained by The Associated Press.

    Lt. Brian Rice, who initially pursued Gray on a Baltimore street when Gray fled after Rice made eye contact April 12, declared three years ago that he “could not continue to go on like this” and threatened to commit an act that was censored in the public version of a report obtained by the AP from the Carroll County, Maryland, Sheriff’s Office. Rice lived in the county, about 35 miles northwest of Baltimore. At the time, deputies were responding to a request to check on his welfare by a fellow Baltimore police officer who is the mother of Rice’s son.

    Deputies reported that Rice appeared “normal and soft spoken” and said he had been seeking “sympathy and attention.” But citing “credible information,” the deputies confiscated both his official and personal guns, called his commanding officer and transported Rice to the Carroll Hospital Center. The weapons included his .40-caliber police pistol, a 9 mm handgun, an AK-47-style rifle, a .22-caliber rifle and two shotguns.

    It was not immediately clear how long Rice was at the hospital or whether he went on his own accord. Rice declined to speak with the AP or discuss allegations in a subsequent court filing that he had behaved in erratic or threatening ways toward family members. When the AP visited Rice’s home last week and left a note requesting an interview, Rice called the sheriff’s department to report the visit as trespassing. Karen McAleer, the mother of his son, also declined to speak with the AP.

    The events described in the 2012 report provided the basis for one of at least two administrative suspensions for Rice in 2012 and 2013, a person familiar with the police department staff said. This person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss confidential personnel matters.

    The incidents described in the sheriff’s report and court records involving Rice’s personal problems portray allegations of concerns about self-control and judgment, as Baltimore police and the Justice Department investigate the injuries that Gray, 25, sustained in police custody. Police have said Gray ran after making eye contact with Rice. After a brief chase, Gray was arrested “without force or incident,” according to a report filled out by one of the officers, though witness video shows officers kneeling around Gray while he screams. After being transported in the back of a police van, Gray was found unable to talk or breathe and died one week later from spinal trauma.

    It also was not immediately clear whether or when all of Rice’s guns were returned. The sheriff’s report said the weapons “should be returned back to owner pending determination of the (censored).” But Rice was accused in June 2012 of removing a semi-automatic handgun from the trunk of his personal vehicle and threatening McAleer, according to a complaint filed in 2013. A police report about that June 2012 incident omitted any reference to allegations that Rice brandished a weapon but noted that officers who responded spent hours searching for Rice over concerns for his welfare.

    Baltimore police were made aware of worries that Rice might pose a risk to himself or others, according to the April 2012 sheriff’s report. Sheriff’s deputies spoke to a police commander for the city’s western district, where Rice worked, who initially requested that deputies not fax the report with details about their experiences with Rice because he would make arrangements to pick up a copy of the report and Rice’s service weapon. The official, whose name is twice misspelled, appeared to be James Handley, a police major who now heads Baltimore police’s property division.

    A police spokesman, Capt. John Kowalczyk, said he could not comment on matters that might involve an officer’s personnel file. Speaking generally of department procedure, Kowalczyk said that the department had overhauled its procedures for dealing with discipline and employees who need help with personal matters since the arrival of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts in September 2012.

    “These are tremendous changes to how we hold people accountable,” Kowalczyk said. He credited the changes for what he said were recent declines in complaints about officer misconduct and an increase in the percentage of disciplinary actions sustained by the police department’s trial board.

    An attorney representing Rice, Michael Davey, did not respond Thursday to phone calls from AP asking to discuss the sheriff’s report about Rice’s hospitalization or gun seizures. Earlier in the week, he dismissed the significance of Rice also being placed on administrative leave as a result of a complaint in January 2013 by McAleer’s then-husband, Andrew, a former Baltimore firefighter who said Rice threatened him and asked for a court protective order. Those threat claims were initially reported by The Guardian newspaper.

    Andrew McAleer, who did not respond to a note left at his last known address in court records, wrote to a judge that Rice had been transported in the earlier incident “to a local hospital for a mental health evaluation.” A judge granted the protective order but allowed it to expire after one week.

    “People file peace orders all the time,” Davey said. “The only thing I’d comment on is, any issues similar to this had nothing to do with his ability to perform his duties as a Baltimore police officer.”

    The Carroll County Sheriff’s Office did not explain why it censored parts of the report it provided to the AP. Maryland law allows law enforcement officials to protect details about a person’s medical or psychological condition in public records.

  • Jack Bauer

    “…..What the Baltimore PD obviously did is known as “ROUGH RIDING…..”

    Obviously? ??
    Really? And you know this HOW exactly? Are you an eyewitness?

    “…..NYPD do this tactic as well and were rounding up men on Staten Island last summer doing the same thing…”

    Again, you know this how exactly? Funny how, the Baltimore case, one prisoner in the van ended up with an injured spine, and the other was perfectly fine when he arrived…….

    Seems to me if this were such a common practice as you are asserting, there would a 50 mile long line of liberal ACLU types, just salivating over the prospect of taking the case so they could have the “honor” of hammering the police. Funny, but I haven’t seen these cases being brought to court.

    “….but any of us can end up in police vans especially when quotas are running short…..”

    Quotas?? What quotas? Do you honestly think that at any time in these hell-holes like Baltimore, that the police have to spend time thinking: “Gee….no crime around anywhere today. Guess we just have to go out and arrest some model citizens to make our “quota”.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    By Associated Press

    April 30, 2015 | 5:41pm

    Modal Trigger

    Photo: AP

    FOLLOW THE STORY

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    Freddie Gray died after head slammed into bolt in police van: report

    Police van carrying Freddie Gray made mystery stop

    Radio DJ suspended over ‘insensitive’ Freddie Gray post

    Protests return in Ferguson for second straight night

    Baltimore mom’s ‘tough love’ praised by pastorSEE ALL 34 STORIES

    BALTIMORE — The highest-ranking Baltimore police officer in the arrest that led to Freddie Gray’s death was hospitalized in April 2012 over mental health concerns for an unknown duration and had his guns confiscated by local sheriff’s deputies, according to records from the sheriff’s office and court obtained by The Associated Press.

    Lt. Brian Rice, who initially pursued Gray on a Baltimore street when Gray fled after Rice made eye contact April 12, declared three years ago that he “could not continue to go on like this” and threatened to commit an act that was censored in the public version of a report obtained by the AP from the Carroll County, Maryland, Sheriff’s Office. Rice lived in the county, about 35 miles northwest of Baltimore. At the time, deputies were responding to a request to check on his welfare by a fellow Baltimore police officer who is the mother of Rice’s son.

    Deputies reported that Rice appeared “normal and soft spoken” and said he had been seeking “sympathy and attention.” But citing “credible information,” the deputies confiscated both his official and personal guns, called his commanding officer and transported Rice to the Carroll Hospital Center. The weapons included his .40-caliber police pistol, a 9 mm handgun, an AK-47-style rifle, a .22-caliber rifle and two shotguns.

    It was not immediately clear how long Rice was at the hospital or whether he went on his own accord. Rice declined to speak with the AP or discuss allegations in a subsequent court filing that he had behaved in erratic or threatening ways toward family members. When the AP visited Rice’s home last week and left a note requesting an interview, Rice called the sheriff’s department to report the visit as trespassing. Karen McAleer, the mother of his son, also declined to speak with the AP.

    The events described in the 2012 report provided the basis for one of at least two administrative suspensions for Rice in 2012 and 2013, a person familiar with the police department staff said. This person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss confidential personnel matters.

    The incidents described in the sheriff’s report and court records involving Rice’s personal problems portray allegations of concerns about self-control and judgment, as Baltimore police and the Justice Department investigate the injuries that Gray, 25, sustained in police custody. Police have said Gray ran after making eye contact with Rice. After a brief chase, Gray was arrested “without force or incident,” according to a report filled out by one of the officers, though witness video shows officers kneeling around Gray while he screams. After being transported in the back of a police van, Gray was found unable to talk or breathe and died one week later from spinal trauma.

    It also was not immediately clear whether or when all of Rice’s guns were returned. The sheriff’s report said the weapons “should be returned back to owner pending determination of the (censored).” But Rice was accused in June 2012 of removing a semi-automatic handgun from the trunk of his personal vehicle and threatening McAleer, according to a complaint filed in 2013. A police report about that June 2012 incident omitted any reference to allegations that Rice brandished a weapon but noted that officers who responded spent hours searching for Rice over concerns for his welfare.

    Baltimore police were made aware of worries that Rice might pose a risk to himself or others, according to the April 2012 sheriff’s report. Sheriff’s deputies spoke to a police commander for the city’s western district, where Rice worked, who initially requested that deputies not fax the report with details about their experiences with Rice because he would make arrangements to pick up a copy of the report and Rice’s service weapon. The official, whose name is twice misspelled, appeared to be James Handley, a police major who now heads Baltimore police’s property division.

    A police spokesman, Capt. John Kowalczyk, said he could not comment on matters that might involve an officer’s personnel file. Speaking generally of department procedure, Kowalczyk said that the department had overhauled its procedures for dealing with discipline and employees who need help with personal matters since the arrival of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts in September 2012.

    “These are tremendous changes to how we hold people accountable,” Kowalczyk said. He credited the changes for what he said were recent declines in complaints about officer misconduct and an increase in the percentage of disciplinary actions sustained by the police department’s trial board.

    An attorney representing Rice, Michael Davey, did not respond Thursday to phone calls from AP asking to discuss the sheriff’s report about Rice’s hospitalization or gun seizures. Earlier in the week, he dismissed the significance of Rice also being placed on administrative leave as a result of a complaint in January 2013 by McAleer’s then-husband, Andrew, a former Baltimore firefighter who said Rice threatened him and asked for a court protective order. Those threat claims were initially reported by The Guardian newspaper.

    Andrew McAleer, who did not respond to a note left at his last known address in court records, wrote to a judge that Rice had been transported in the earlier incident “to a local hospital for a mental health evaluation.” A judge granted the protective order but allowed it to expire after one week.

    “People file peace orders all the time,” Davey said. “The only thing I’d comment on is, any issues similar to this had nothing to do with his ability to perform his duties as a Baltimore police officer.”

    The Carroll County Sheriff’s Office did not explain why it censored parts of the report it provided to the AP. Maryland law allows law enforcement officials to protect details about a person’s medical or psychological condition in public records.

  • Jack Bauer

    “…..What the Baltimore PD obviously did is known as “ROUGH RIDING…..”

    Obviously? ??
    Really? And you know this HOW exactly? Are you an eyewitness?

    “…..NYPD do this tactic as well and were rounding up men on Staten Island last summer doing the same thing…”

    Again, you know this how exactly? Funny how, the Baltimore case, one prisoner in the van ended up with an injured spine, and the other was perfectly fine when he arrived…….

    Seems to me if this were such a common practice as you are asserting, there would a 50 mile long line of liberal ACLU types, just salivating over the prospect of taking the case so they could have the “honor” of hammering the police. Funny, but I haven’t seen these cases being brought to court.

    “….but any of us can end up in police vans especially when quotas are running short…..”

    Quotas?? What quotas? Do you honestly think that at any time in these hell-holes like Baltimore, that the police have to spend time thinking: “Gee….no crime around anywhere today. Guess we just have to go out and arrest some model citizens to make our “quota”.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    By Associated Press

    April 30, 2015 | 5:41pm

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    BALTIMORE — The highest-ranking Baltimore police officer in the arrest that led to Freddie Gray’s death was hospitalized in April 2012 over mental health concerns for an unknown duration and had his guns confiscated by local sheriff’s deputies, according to records from the sheriff’s office and court obtained by The Associated Press.

    Lt. Brian Rice, who initially pursued Gray on a Baltimore street when Gray fled after Rice made eye contact April 12, declared three years ago that he “could not continue to go on like this” and threatened to commit an act that was censored in the public version of a report obtained by the AP from the Carroll County, Maryland, Sheriff’s Office. Rice lived in the county, about 35 miles northwest of Baltimore. At the time, deputies were responding to a request to check on his welfare by a fellow Baltimore police officer who is the mother of Rice’s son.

    Deputies reported that Rice appeared “normal and soft spoken” and said he had been seeking “sympathy and attention.” But citing “credible information,” the deputies confiscated both his official and personal guns, called his commanding officer and transported Rice to the Carroll Hospital Center. The weapons included his .40-caliber police pistol, a 9 mm handgun, an AK-47-style rifle, a .22-caliber rifle and two shotguns.

    It was not immediately clear how long Rice was at the hospital or whether he went on his own accord. Rice declined to speak with the AP or discuss allegations in a subsequent court filing that he had behaved in erratic or threatening ways toward family members. When the AP visited Rice’s home last week and left a note requesting an interview, Rice called the sheriff’s department to report the visit as trespassing. Karen McAleer, the mother of his son, also declined to speak with the AP.

    The events described in the 2012 report provided the basis for one of at least two administrative suspensions for Rice in 2012 and 2013, a person familiar with the police department staff said. This person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss confidential personnel matters.

    The incidents described in the sheriff’s report and court records involving Rice’s personal problems portray allegations of concerns about self-control and judgment, as Baltimore police and the Justice Department investigate the injuries that Gray, 25, sustained in police custody. Police have said Gray ran after making eye contact with Rice. After a brief chase, Gray was arrested “without force or incident,” according to a report filled out by one of the officers, though witness video shows officers kneeling around Gray while he screams. After being transported in the back of a police van, Gray was found unable to talk or breathe and died one week later from spinal trauma.

    It also was not immediately clear whether or when all of Rice’s guns were returned. The sheriff’s report said the weapons “should be returned back to owner pending determination of the (censored).” But Rice was accused in June 2012 of removing a semi-automatic handgun from the trunk of his personal vehicle and threatening McAleer, according to a complaint filed in 2013. A police report about that June 2012 incident omitted any reference to allegations that Rice brandished a weapon but noted that officers who responded spent hours searching for Rice over concerns for his welfare.

    Baltimore police were made aware of worries that Rice might pose a risk to himself or others, according to the April 2012 sheriff’s report. Sheriff’s deputies spoke to a police commander for the city’s western district, where Rice worked, who initially requested that deputies not fax the report with details about their experiences with Rice because he would make arrangements to pick up a copy of the report and Rice’s service weapon. The official, whose name is twice misspelled, appeared to be James Handley, a police major who now heads Baltimore police’s property division.

    A police spokesman, Capt. John Kowalczyk, said he could not comment on matters that might involve an officer’s personnel file. Speaking generally of department procedure, Kowalczyk said that the department had overhauled its procedures for dealing with discipline and employees who need help with personal matters since the arrival of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts in September 2012.

    “These are tremendous changes to how we hold people accountable,” Kowalczyk said. He credited the changes for what he said were recent declines in complaints about officer misconduct and an increase in the percentage of disciplinary actions sustained by the police department’s trial board.

    An attorney representing Rice, Michael Davey, did not respond Thursday to phone calls from AP asking to discuss the sheriff’s report about Rice’s hospitalization or gun seizures. Earlier in the week, he dismissed the significance of Rice also being placed on administrative leave as a result of a complaint in January 2013 by McAleer’s then-husband, Andrew, a former Baltimore firefighter who said Rice threatened him and asked for a court protective order. Those threat claims were initially reported by The Guardian newspaper.

    Andrew McAleer, who did not respond to a note left at his last known address in court records, wrote to a judge that Rice had been transported in the earlier incident “to a local hospital for a mental health evaluation.” A judge granted the protective order but allowed it to expire after one week.

    “People file peace orders all the time,” Davey said. “The only thing I’d comment on is, any issues similar to this had nothing to do with his ability to perform his duties as a Baltimore police officer.”

    The Carroll County Sheriff’s Office did not explain why it censored parts of the report it provided to the AP. Maryland law allows law enforcement officials to protect details about a person’s medical or psychological condition in public records.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    By Associated Press

    April 30, 2015 | 5:41pm

    Top-ranking cop in Gray arrest has history of mental instability

    BALTIMORE — The highest-ranking Baltimore police officer in the arrest that led to Freddie Gray’s death was hospitalized in April 2012 over mental health concerns for an unknown duration and had his guns confiscated by local sheriff’s deputies, according to records from the sheriff’s office and court obtained by The Associated Press.

    Lt. Brian Rice, who initially pursued Gray on a Baltimore street when Gray fled after Rice made eye contact April 12, declared three years ago that he “could not continue to go on like this” and threatened to commit an act that was censored in the public version of a report obtained by the AP from the Carroll County, Maryland, Sheriff’s Office. Rice lived in the county, about 35 miles northwest of Baltimore. At the time, deputies were responding to a request to check on his welfare by a fellow Baltimore police officer who is the mother of Rice’s son.

    Deputies reported that Rice appeared “normal and soft spoken” and said he had been seeking “sympathy and attention.” But citing “credible information,” the deputies confiscated both his official and personal guns, called his commanding officer and transported Rice to the Carroll Hospital Center. The weapons included his .40-caliber police pistol, a 9 mm handgun, an AK-47-style rifle, a .22-caliber rifle and two shotguns.

    It was not immediately clear how long Rice was at the hospital or whether he went on his own accord. Rice declined to speak with the AP or discuss allegations in a subsequent court filing that he had behaved in erratic or threatening ways toward family members. When the AP visited Rice’s home last week and left a note requesting an interview, Rice called the sheriff’s department to report the visit as trespassing. Karen McAleer, the mother of his son, also declined to speak with the AP.

    The events described in the 2012 report provided the basis for one of at least two administrative suspensions for Rice in 2012 and 2013, a person familiar with the police department staff said. This person spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss confidential personnel matters.

    The incidents described in the sheriff’s report and court records involving Rice’s personal problems portray allegations of concerns about self-control and judgment, as Baltimore police and the Justice Department investigate the injuries that Gray, 25, sustained in police custody. Police have said Gray ran after making eye contact with Rice. After a brief chase, Gray was arrested “without force or incident,” according to a report filled out by one of the officers, though witness video shows officers kneeling around Gray while he screams. After being transported in the back of a police van, Gray was found unable to talk or breathe and died one week later from spinal trauma.

    It also was not immediately clear whether or when all of Rice’s guns were returned. The sheriff’s report said the weapons “should be returned back to owner pending determination of the (censored).” But Rice was accused in June 2012 of removing a semi-automatic handgun from the trunk of his personal vehicle and threatening McAleer, according to a complaint filed in 2013. A police report about that June 2012 incident omitted any reference to allegations that Rice brandished a weapon but noted that officers who responded spent hours searching for Rice over concerns for his welfare.

    Baltimore police were made aware of worries that Rice might pose a risk to himself or others, according to the April 2012 sheriff’s report. Sheriff’s deputies spoke to a police commander for the city’s western district, where Rice worked, who initially requested that deputies not fax the report with details about their experiences with Rice because he would make arrangements to pick up a copy of the report and Rice’s service weapon. The official, whose name is twice misspelled, appeared to be James Handley, a police major who now heads Baltimore police’s property division.

    A police spokesman, Capt. John Kowalczyk, said he could not comment on matters that might involve an officer’s personnel file. Speaking generally of department procedure, Kowalczyk said that the department had overhauled its procedures for dealing with discipline and employees who need help with personal matters since the arrival of Police Commissioner Anthony Batts in September 2012.

    “These are tremendous changes to how we hold people accountable,” Kowalczyk said. He credited the changes for what he said were recent declines in complaints about officer misconduct and an increase in the percentage of disciplinary actions sustained by the police department’s trial board.

    An attorney representing Rice, Michael Davey, did not respond Thursday to phone calls from AP asking to discuss the sheriff’s report about Rice’s hospitalization or gun seizures. Earlier in the week, he dismissed the significance of Rice also being placed on administrative leave as a result of a complaint in January 2013 by McAleer’s then-husband, Andrew, a former Baltimore firefighter who said Rice threatened him and asked for a court protective order. Those threat claims were initially reported by The Guardian newspaper.

    Andrew McAleer, who did not respond to a note left at his last known address in court records, wrote to a judge that Rice had been transported in the earlier incident “to a local hospital for a mental health evaluation.” A judge granted the protective order but allowed it to expire after one week.

    “People file peace orders all the time,” Davey said. “The only thing I’d comment on is, any issues similar to this had nothing to do with his ability to perform his duties as a Baltimore police officer.”

    The Carroll County Sheriff’s Office did not explain why it censored parts of the report it provided to the AP. Maryland law allows law enforcement officials to protect details about a person’s medical or psychological condition in public records.

  • DJ

    Looking at his rap sheet I come away with the distinct impression he is one dumb negroid.

    You’d think after being busted for possession of drugs more than once, he’d figure out how NOT to get caught. But then again, the average IQ of blacks is 85. That means half of all blacks have an IQ less than 85. It is noteworthy that up until 1973 the medical profession set the threshold of mental retardation at 85. Due to immense political pressure from civil rights groups, the threshold was lowered to 70.

    That said, I think it’s a safe bet to say Freddie’s IQ is at or below 85.

    Bottom line,

    Poor ol’ Freddie is a victim of his own stupidity.

  • DJ

    Looking at his rap sheet I come away with the distinct impression he is one dumb negroid.

    You’d think after being busted for possession of drugs more than once, he’d figure out how to NOT get caught. But then again, the average IQ of blacks is 85. That means half of all blacks have an IQ less than 85. It is noteworthy that up until 1973 the medical profession set the threshold of mental retardation at 85. Due to immense political pressure from civil rights groups, the threshold was lowered to 70.

    That said, I think it’s a safe bet to say Freddie’s IQ is at or below 85.

    Bottom line,

    Poor ol’ Freddie is a victim of his own stupidity.

  • TED

    The REAL answer…

    http://media.townhall.com/Townhall/Car/b/lb0430cd20150428084520.jpg

    but then suggesting blacks CHANGE their culture and they might save their kids is
    RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACIST!

  • TED

    The REAL answer…

    http://media.townhall.com/Townhall/Car/b/lb0430cd20150428084520.jpg

    but then suggesting blacks CHANGE their culture and they might save their kids is
    RAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACIST!

  • TED
  • TED
  • TED

    FRANKLY, The whole Baltimore, Freddie Gray thing…

  • TED

    FRANKLY, The whole Baltimore, Freddie Gray thing…

  • Son_of_Taz

    Nice graphic Ted! I’m borrowing it…..

  • Eddie_Valiant

    Nice graphic Ted! I’m borrowing it…..

  • Son_of_Taz

    I’ve seen retarded kids wearing helmets – did Freddie forget his?

  • Eddie_Valiant

    I’ve seen retarded kids wearing helmets – did Freddie forget his?

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    In my city, we would keep the traffic in the dark people – the colored. They’re animals anyway, so let them lose their souls.”
    ―Giuseppe Zaluchi[src]

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    In my city, we would keep the traffic in the dark people – the colored. They’re animals anyway, so let them lose their souls.”
    ―Giuseppe Zaluchi[src]

  • Son_of_Taz

    Darwin’s natural selection at its best.

  • Eddie_Valiant

    Darwin’s natural selection at its best.

  • Jack Bauer

    Obviously you couldn’t answer any of the questions I posed.
    Why am I not surprised?
    Then you post this defamatory story by AP, as though that supports your claims. It doesn’t, but no doubt you are able to form your desired conclusion from it anyway.

    Many police officers, just like many soldiers suffer from psychological problems due to the stress of their jobs. When they do, they are evaluated thoroughly before they can go back on the job. Trying to smear this guy is shameful, when you don’t really know anything about him.

    i notice that you didn’t post the article that quoted the other prisoner in the van as stating that Gray was slamming himself around in the police van. The other prisoner stated that Gray seemed to be trying to injure himself for reasons unknown to him.

    The fact is, you don’t know any of the pertinent details of the investigation, and neither do I. The difference is, I’m willing to wait to hear the facts, and you, much like the people who rioted and burned down the CVS, feel quite comfortable making up your minds in advance, without knowing the facts.

  • Jack Bauer

    Obviously you couldn’t answer any of the questions I posed.
    Why am I not surprised?
    Then you post this defamatory story by AP, as though that supports your claims. It doesn’t, but no doubt you are able to form your desired conclusion from it anyway.

    Many police officers, just like many soldiers suffer from psychological problems due to the stress of their jobs. When they do, they are evaluated thoroughly before they can go back on the job. Trying to smear this guy is shameful, when you don’t really know anything about him.

    i notice that you didn’t post the article that quoted the other prisoner in the van as stating that Gray was slamming himself around in the police van. The other prisoner stated that Gray seemed to be trying to injure himself for reasons unknown to him.

    The fact is, you don’t know any of the pertinent details of the investigation, and neither do I. The difference is, I’m willing to wait to hear the facts, and you, much like the people who rioted and burned down the CVS, feel quite comfortable making up your minds in advance, without knowing the facts.

  • DJ

    Taz,
    Apparently, Freddie had no parental supervision. Remember, we’re taking about ghetto culture here….

  • Xavier

    No one – not you, nor I, nor the media, nor the mobs – has the right to prejudge a suspected crime. We have the fairest judicial system in the world (unless the DOJ becomes involved) and it usually does a pretty good job. Tell the media and the mobs to STFU and let justice take its course.

    Damn. Didn’t mean to post this under Ted’s graphic.
    Sorry.

  • DJ

    Taz,
    Apparently, Freddie had no parental supervision. Remember, we’re taking about ghetto culture here….

  • Xavier

    No one – not you, nor I, nor the media, nor the mobs – has the right to prejudge a suspected crime. We have the fairest judicial system in the world (unless the DOJ becomes involved) and it usually does a pretty good job. Tell the media and the mobs to STFU and let justice take its course.

    Damn. Didn’t mean to post this under Ted’s graphic.
    Sorry.

  • Xavier

    I don’t trust most blacks and don’t trust most police, and who cares if these thugs burn a few cities that have been under Democrat control for decades? Reap what ye sow.

  • Xavier

    I don’t trust most blacks and don’t trust most police, and who cares if these thugs burn a few cities that have been under Democrat control for decades? Reap what ye sow.

  • DJ

    “I don’t trust most blacks and don’t trust most police, and who cares if these thugs burn a few cities that have been under [Nergro] control for decades? Reap what ye sow.”

    There, I fixed it for ya.

  • DJ

    “I don’t trust most blacks and don’t trust most police, and who cares if these thugs burn a few cities that have been under [Nergro] control for decades? Reap what ye sow.”

    There, I fixed it for ya.

  • Tom Sawyer

    If the police were responsible for his death, then the union should claim that they were driven to do it because of all the pent up frustration, anger and hopelessness of having to police such antisocial and dysfunctional communities for the better part their waking hours. Through it back in their face…watch heads explode.

  • Tom Sawyer

    If the police were responsible for his death, then the union should claim that they were driven to do it because of all the pent up frustration, anger and hopelessness of having to police such antisocial and dysfunctional communities for the better part their waking hours. Through it back in their face…watch heads explode.

  • MAS

    Following the timeline of his arrest record it seems Mr Gray had little reason to become more street wise to the Police. Why should he? He got very little actual jail or prison time for his crimes. I know from personal experience how frustrating it is to deal with this…might as well just have ignored this small businessman (sarcasm).

  • MAS

    Following the timeline of his arrest record it seems Mr Gray had little reason to become more street wise to the Police. Why should he? He got very little actual jail or prison time for his crimes. I know from personal experience how frustrating it is to deal with this…might as well just have ignored this small businessman (sarcasm).

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    The NY Times reports that two other Baltimore men had been seriously injured during “rough rides.” One of the men, Jeffrey Alston, was paralyzed from the neck down and eventually received a $6 million settlement from the city.

    Typical cop response “how do you know?” I have eyes and am not blind, I have ears and I am not deaf. Let me guess, that isn’t enough for you and your ilk.

    No Quotas? That is laughable.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    The NY Times reports that two other Baltimore men had been seriously injured during “rough rides.” One of the men, Jeffrey Alston, was paralyzed from the neck down and eventually received a $6 million settlement from the city.

    Typical cop response “how do you know?” I have eyes and am not blind, I have ears and I am not deaf. Let me guess, that isn’t enough for you and your ilk.

    No Quotas? That is laughable.

  • Pingback: The people must be punished: Playing Race Cards | Head Space()

  • TED

    COPY THAT! ! Under this graphic is OK. And the sentiment is right on!

  • TED

    COPY THAT! ! Under this graphic is OK. And the sentiment is right on!

  • bi0nical

    Does all this nonsense make it ok for the police to break his spine?

  • badr0bot

    Does all this nonsense make it ok for the police to break his spine?

  • TED

    Weather they did or didn’t I just DON’T have a problem giving these ANIMALS a “Rough Ride”, This isn’t his lemo to the prom. A little incentive to NOT do it again is OK by me.

  • TED

    Weather they did or didn’t I just DON’T have a problem giving these ANIMALS a “Rough Ride”, This isn’t his lemo to the prom. A little incentive to NOT do it again is OK by me.

  • grayjohn

    They didn’t.

  • grayjohn

    They didn’t.

  • TED

    It so fit this stuff…

  • TED

    AMEN!!

  • TED

    It so fit this stuff…

  • TED

    AMEN!!

  • TED

    As a whole – HELL YES!

  • TED

    But It would have.

  • TED

    As a whole – HELL YES – IF THEY HAD!

  • TED

    But It would have.

  • TED

    Being handed SOFT TIME, all the time, KARMA caught up with him.

  • TED

    Being handed SOFT TIME, all the time, KARMA caught up with him.

  • Chish

    Our generation had Abraham, Martin & John. The thugs have
    Skittles, Swisher and Spinal. Sigh….

  • Chish

    Our generation had Abraham, Martin & John. The thugs have
    Skittles, Swisher and Spinal. Sigh….

  • Pingback: Baltimore’s Freddie Gray, drug dealer with 18 arrests | BUNKERVILLE | God, Guns and Guts Comrades!()

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    It is Involuntary Manslaughter to cause by reckless deed the death of another.

    We aren’t talking about “tuning up” somebody. I agree there are a lot of people who could benefit from a tune up, starting in the halls of DC first. We aren’t talking about arch villains.
    These were penny ante drug dealers, he should have made an effort to better understand the role and how to play it, but I digress. Stupid criminals …

    What so many don’t get is that the police aren’t confining their sadism to criminal blacks. I myself have witnessed police terrorizing innocent men. I have no more respect for them and see them as just another criminal gang who goes out of their way to terrorize. Whereas non-state sanctioned gangs only terrorize you if you are in “their” neighborhoods or they know you have valuables that they can take and be an easy mark.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    It is Involuntary Manslaughter to cause by reckless deed the death of another.

    We aren’t talking about “tuning up” somebody. I agree there are a lot of people who could benefit from a tune up, starting in the halls of DC first. We aren’t talking about arch villains.
    These were penny ante drug dealers, he should have made an effort to better understand the role and how to play it, but I digress. Stupid criminals …

    What so many don’t get is that the police aren’t confining their sadism to criminal blacks. I myself have witnessed police terrorizing innocent men. I have no more respect for them and see them as just another criminal gang who goes out of their way to terrorize. Whereas non-state sanctioned gangs only terrorize you if you are in “their” neighborhoods or they know you have valuables that they can take and be an easy mark.

  • Jack Bauer

    “….Typical cop response “how do you know?” I have eyes and am not blind, I have ears and I am not deaf. Let me guess, that isn’t enough for you and your ilk…..”

    Oh how very profound. You forgot to mention that you have a brain, but you seem reluctant to use it, at least insofar as being able to wait for the facts.
    So why don’t we just restructure our system to go with whatever YOU feel is right. To hell with courts, judges, facts, evidence, etc. — your “eyes and ears” a.k.a your biased opinion, should be good enough for the rest of us to pass judgment.

    Incidentally, the two incidents you mentioned were adjudicated, and the city decided to settle rather than pursue the cases further. (What the hell, it was only taxpayer money anyway…..). Moreover, no police were charged with wrongdoing as the events were considered accidents.

  • Jack Bauer

    “….Typical cop response “how do you know?” I have eyes and am not blind, I have ears and I am not deaf. Let me guess, that isn’t enough for you and your ilk…..”

    Oh how very profound. You forgot to mention that you have a brain, but you seem reluctant to use it, at least insofar as being able to wait for the facts.
    So why don’t we just restructure our system to go with whatever YOU feel is right. To hell with courts, judges, facts, evidence, etc. — your “eyes and ears” a.k.a your biased opinion, should be good enough for the rest of us to pass judgment.

    Incidentally, the two incidents you mentioned were adjudicated, and the city decided to settle rather than pursue the cases further. (What the hell, it was only taxpayer money anyway…..). Moreover, no police were charged with wrongdoing as the events were considered accidents.

  • Damned good point Tom.

  • Damned good point Tom.

  • MAS

    How about Divine Providence? How many lives has he mindlessly and greedily helped down the path to destruction? Victims around the drug culture (violence, child neglect, and theft) are often the ones that get swept under the rug. Nope Mr Gray finally got his judgement day…

  • MAS

    How about Divine Providence? How many lives has he mindlessly and greedily helped down the path to destruction? Victims around the drug culture (violence, child neglect, and theft) are often the ones that get swept under the rug. Nope Mr Gray finally got his judgement day…

  • TED

    COPY THAT! And the SAME to ALL of them.

  • TED

    COPY THAT! And the SAME to ALL of them.

  • Mickey Shea

    He wuz a honor stoodent

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    The six police officers who have been suspended since Gray’s death face charges ranging from murder to manslaughter, assault and official misconduct. The cops and the charges against them are:

    • Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., the van driver: Second-degree depraved heart murder, involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, manslaughter by vehicle, misconduct in office.

    •Officer William G. Porter: Involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office.

    •Lt. Brian W. Rice, who initiated the chase: Involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office, false imprisonment.

    •Officer Edward M. Nero: Second-degree assault, misconduct in office, false imprisonment.

    •Officer Garrett Miller: Second-degree assault, misconduct in office, false imprisonment.

    •Sgt. Alicia D. White: Manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office.

  • Mickey Shea

    He wuz a honor stoodent

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    The six police officers who have been suspended since Gray’s death face charges ranging from murder to manslaughter, assault and official misconduct. The cops and the charges against them are:

    • Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., the van driver: Second-degree depraved heart murder, involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, manslaughter by vehicle, misconduct in office.

    •Officer William G. Porter: Involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office.

    •Lt. Brian W. Rice, who initiated the chase: Involuntary manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office, false imprisonment.

    •Officer Edward M. Nero: Second-degree assault, misconduct in office, false imprisonment.

    •Officer Garrett Miller: Second-degree assault, misconduct in office, false imprisonment.

    •Sgt. Alicia D. White: Manslaughter, second-degree assault, misconduct in office.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    In my city, we would keep the traffic in the dark people – the colored. They’re animals anyway, so let them lose their souls.”
    ―Giuseppe Zaluchi[src]

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    In my city, we would keep the traffic in the dark people – the colored. They’re animals anyway, so let them lose their souls.”
    ―Giuseppe Zaluchi[src]

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    I am for arming the “rebels” of Baltimore, a good old fashioned bloodletting would do so much good for the societal body. Civil War II has to start somewhere. Here’s hoping to a prolonged stalemate that drains both sides in endless bloodletting for a decade – then perhaps the rest of us can be left alone, free from the intrusions of State sponsored and State empowered criminals. We could be free of tyrant police and free from non-state sanctioned criminal gangs. A win -win.

  • THOUGHTCRIMINAL2084

    I am for arming the “rebels” of Baltimore, a good old fashioned bloodletting would do so much good for the societal body. Civil War II has to start somewhere. Here’s hoping to a prolonged stalemate that drains both sides in endless bloodletting for a decade – then perhaps the rest of us can be left alone, free from the intrusions of State sponsored and State empowered criminals. We could be free of tyrant police and free from non-state sanctioned criminal gangs. A win -win.

  • kerri

    Think mebe he was trying to make himself look beat up enough to cash in like Rodney King ???
    I do.

  • kerri

    Think mebe he was trying to make himself look beat up enough to cash in like Rodney King ???
    I do.

  • Ron H Spins

    Here is the cops charged in the Grey Homicide.

  • Ron H Spins

    Here is the cops charged in the Grey Homicide.

  • BUBBA

    There is a reason they are called Baltimorans.

  • BUBBA

    There is a reason they are called Baltimorans.

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