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Feb 08 2012

War on Salt Heats Up

As predicted, NYC Mayor for Life Michael Bloomberg’s War on Salt is catching on nationally. Brought to you by your tax dollar, compliments of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

• About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet.

• Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1,200 mg per day on average could save up to $20 billion a year in medical costs.

• Types of foods matter — More than 40% of sodium comes from the following 10 types of foods: breads and rolls, [et cetera, et cetera].

You read that correctly. The federal government is warning you not to eat bread.

Concerned about this fresh menace to your health? Don’t worry; Big Government is right there in your face to help by:

• Using the national “Million Hearts™” initiative to prevent a million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years (http://millionhearts.hhs.govExternal Web Site Icon). Reducing sodium in the population is a major part of this initiative.

• Encouraging its agencies and departments to adopt the HHS/GSA or similar procurement guidelines that define how much sodium there can be in products that are sold or served in their facilities (www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/guidelines/food-service-guidelines.htm).

• Improving data collection on sodium, including the amount of sodium people consume, and their knowledge, behaviors and health outcomes.

Salt is not only the world’s most popular seasoning, but an essential nutrient. If experience is any guide, the mostly voluntary measures to stop us from consuming it will soon give way to more coercive tactics. Now might be a good time to start stocking up, unless you want to pay black market prices for something you literally cannot live without.

salt
Coming soon to a black market near you.

On a tip from Muddypaw.



  • It’s pure cultural marxism to want food to be bland and unenjoyable.

  • Sam Adams

    Part of the “Golden Rule” specifically, “He who has the gold makes the rules.” When the government pays your health care costs, then they are no longer your Uncle but your Father, and Father knows best.

    BTW, they can now legally control the amount of CO2 that you exhale.

  • Sam Adams

    The only thing that leftist approve of (for now) is the right to enjoy sex with the partner of your choice, without consequences.

    Just remember that it was the “progressives” who brought us prohibition. They haven’t changed, and they haven’t learned a damn thing.

  • StanInTexas

    Some people have health issues with salt and should limit its use in their food. Some people can put salt on everything they eat and be perfectly healthy and content for their entire lives. Yet the Liberals have decided that a thing that is bad for a few should be taken away from EVERYONE.

    Something tells me that Mayor Bloomberg and his Liberal ilk all have an ample supply of salt for THEIR use.

  • kiplingsburdens

    Mayor Doesn’t Always Live by His Health Rules

    By MICHAEL BARBARO
    Published: September 22, 2009

    HE dumps salt on almost everything, even saltine crackers. He devours burnt bacon and peanut butter sandwiches. He has a weakness for hot dogs, cheeseburgers, and fried chicken, washing them down with a glass of merlot.

    Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has become New York City’s nutritional nag, banning the use of trans fats, forcing chain restaurants to post calorie counts and exhorting diners to consume less salt. Now he is at it again, directing his wrath at sugary drinks in a new series of arresting advertisements that ask subway riders: “Are you pouring on the pounds?”

    But an examination of what enters the mayoral mouth reveals that Mr. Bloomberg is an omnivore with his own glaring indulgences, many of them at odds with his own policies. And he struggles mightily to restrain his appetite.

    As a billionaire in one of the dining capitals of the world, he can eat anything he wants. But he is obsessed with his weight — so much so that the sight of an unflattering photo of himself can trigger weeks of intense dieting and crankiness, according to friends and aides.

    His food issues have become New York City’s. Although he has described his battle against unhealthy foods as common-sense public policy that will shed pounds (and save lives), many of his targets overlap with his own cravings.

    “I like a Big Mac like everybody else,” he confessed the other day, explaining the city’s warts-and-all approach to fast food. “I just want to know how many calories are in it.”

    Under his watch, the city has declared sodium an enemy, asking restaurants and food manufacturers to voluntarily cut the salt in their dishes by 20 percent or more, and encouraging diners to “shake the habit” by asking waiters for food without added salt.

    But Mr. Bloomberg, 67, likes his popcorn so salty that it burns others’ lips. (At Gracie Mansion, the cooks deliver it to him with a salt shaker.) He sprinkles so much salt on his morning bagel “that it’s like a pretzel,” said the manager at Viand, a Greek diner near Mr. Bloomberg’s Upper East Side town house.

    Not even pizza is spared a coat of sodium. When the mayor sat down to eat a slice at Denino’s Pizzeria Tavern on Staten Island recently, this reporter spotted him applying six dashes of salt to it.

    A health tip sheet from the mayor’s office tells New Yorkers to “drink smart” by choosing water, even though Mr. Bloomberg has a three- to four-cup-a-day coffee habit.

    “I can count on two hands the number of times I have seen him drink water,” said one dining companion, who spoke on condition of anonymity, so as not to offend the mayor (who likes his coffee weak, and with milk).

    Friends of the mayor said that, like most New Yorkers overwhelmed with food choices, he swings between two dietary poles: indulgence and abstemiousness. After a dinner loaded with fat and salt, they said, he will consume a grapefruit for breakfast, then a bowl of soup for lunch. He keeps a running calorie count in his head, and rarely exceeds 2,000 a day, they said.

    Mr. Bloomberg declined to be interviewed for this article, and his aides advised at least one Manhattan restaurant owner not to speak about what’s on the mayor’s plate.

    But the mayor’s press secretary, Stu Loeser, said Mr. Bloomberg “works as hard as any New Yorker at keeping off extra pounds, and he has trimmed himself down to his college weight, which isn’t at all easy for a 67-year-old.” The mayor, he said “has days when he eats more than he should.” But, he added, “unlike most of us, he has the discipline to even it out the next day.”

    As for his apparent policy of salt as I say, not as I do? Friends note that the mayor smoked cigarettes for years before he banned the practice in restaurants across the city, and besides, it’s the salt in processed foods, not in shakers, that poses the greatest health risk.

    Many public health officials applaud the mayor’s dietary crusades, and even pals who object to them express grudging respect for his convictions. The writer Nora Ephron, who has shared a burger with the mayor at JG Melon (“he relished it,” she said) hates the new calorie counts. “It takes the fun out of everything,” she said.

    “But the mayor’s concerns,” she added, “are larger than mine.”

    Food has always loomed large in Mr. Bloomberg’s life. He speaks fondly of his childhood dinner table in Medford, Mass. — which he would meticulously set himself — where the day’s news was digested alongside a steaming plate of baked chicken and vegetables. His mother was an uneager chef, who passed on a taste for basic fare.

    “The food itself wasn’t that big of a deal,” he told one interviewer. “Peas were Del Monte out of a can, cooked in the sauce and the water that it came in.”

    The city’s eater-in-chief dines out nearly every night of the week, deliberately popping up at restaurants across the five boroughs. And with his campaign for a third term in full swing, he eats out up to three times a day, as he solicits endorsements and meets voters.

    A middle-class kid who became rich in midlife, he seems equally at ease with diner grub and haute cuisine.

    In the span of a few days, he is known to eat dinner at Post House, off Madison Avenue, where the beef Wellington costs $49, and the Scobee Grill, on Northern Boulevard in Queens, where the turkey wrap, with a side, is $10.

    “He orders what he wants to eat, not what he thinks he is supposed to,” said Danny Meyer, whose Union Square Hospitality Group owns the Union Square Cafe, Eleven Madison Park and Gramercy Tavern.

    At Union Square Cafe, Mr. Bloomberg bypasses crispy duck confit in favor of safer staples, like salmon, chicken and pasta. “If we had meatloaf on the menu, I’m sure he would order that,” Mr. Meyer said. “He is not a fancy eater.”

    Several weeks ago, when the mayor and a group of friends stopped at Angelina’s, an Italian restaurant on Staten Island, the chef whipped up an off-the-menu feast of bronzini, duck and steak. But Mr. Bloomberg ordered a simple tomato salad and shrimp cocktail ($15), telling the staff he was watching his waistline. (He eventually snuck a taste of the main courses.)

    His tastes may be diverse, but he relishes the clubby atmosphere of several Manhattan restaurants. He is a regular at Nippon, a high-end Japanese restaurant in Midtown, where he asks for the beef negimayaki ($29), thin slices of broiled rib-eye steak, rolled with scallions in a teriyaki sauce.

    At Quatorze Bis, a cozy French bistro on East 79th Street, the staff has memorized his order: half chicken with herbs, served with fries ($27). “It’s his favorite dish,” said an owner, Mark DiGiulio.

    At Shun Lee Palace, where the plates are flecked with gold leaf, the mayor favors Sichuan shrimp ($23). “He likes very spicy Chinese food,” said the owner Michael Tong.

    When he does not like the food, he rarely holds back. After dining at Blue Smoke, Mr. Meyer’s barbecue restaurant on East 27th Street, the mayor told Mr. Meyer, “I just don’t like it.”

    Mr. Meyer tried inviting him back, but the mayor would not budge. “It never feels good when somebody tells you they don’t like your restaurant, but it’s nice when a politician does not pander,” he said, adding that the mayor has heaped praise on Union Square Cafe.

    His obsession with food extends to its preparation. Unsatisfied with the performance of standard toasters, he asked the waiters at a favorite diner to find the industrial machine that produced his order of perfectly burnt bread. Then he bought a few and placed one of the units near his City Hall desk.

    For New York City’s richest man, his table manners are surprisingly relaxed: he is known to grab food off the plates of aides and, occasionally, even strangers. (“Delicious,” he declared recently, after swiping a piece of fried calamari from an unsuspecting diner in Staten Island.)

    Still, he hates to be fussed over, no matter how much the meal costs. One dinner companion recalled that after Mr. Bloomberg asked for the best bottle of red wine in the house, the restaurant’s manager wanted to describe the wine to the mayor, have him taste it and smell the cork.

    The mayor politely interrupted. “Is this your best bottle?” he asked. The manager said yes. “O.K., then pour it,” he said.

  • GM Car of the Future

    I can see it now…
    youngsters running behind DOT salt trucks in Winter with cups and cans to snatch a handful of salt for their family to use in cooking.

  • Ralph

    Holy crap, Stymie. The Old Man has the basement filled with light bulbs, soup, sacks of rice, boxes of sugar, and now SALT?

  • kiplingsburdens

    People like Der Furor Bloombag are not content to own everything, eat anything and rule everyone; Once they accomplish those things they are left will a hollow void and are certain that they can fill it by depriving everyone else what they enjoy.

    How else can his wealth and power be illustrated but by depriving his subjects of everything? The anti-car crusade is a perfect example, I often do a whiny nasal voice impression of Der Furor- “Now, now only the rich people can have cars – If you don’t have a chauffeur you can’t have a car”…

    I guess I can now do a whiny nasal voiced impression of “if you don’t have a personal chef, you can’t have any salt”.

  • Stymie

    Ralph, he’d better keep a path clear to the ammo boxes! LOL

    Here’s an apropos cartoon for this topic…

    http://www.stormfax.com/LisaRAINS.jpg

  • lao

    Slugs celebrate.

  • gunnerjones

    The Brits tried to control salt in India, didn’t work that well, they ended up losing India

  • Sam Adams

    Call Bloomberg what he is; a tyrannical hypocrite.

  • lao

    Meanwhile, back with the link:

    Americans eat on average about 3,300 mg of sodium a day. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg a day, and about 6 out of 10 adults should further limit sodium to 1,500 mg a day.

  • Mickey Shea

    Shortly after Bloomberg outlawed smoking in all public spaces, restaurants and bars, he attended an annual
    meeting of Wall Street’s biggest movers and shakers that was held in a hotel dining room. After dinner, as was the
    tradition, everybody lit up cigars.

  • ent

    Our government grows more insane by the day. Science has been totally hijacked. The idea that salt is dangerous was debunked 20-some years ago! Will they ever let it go?

    It *might* be dangerous if taken in very large quantities by someone with very high blood pressure, but that’s about it. There is a real danger, however, from too *little* salt in the diet, a condition which our insane government seems determined to inflict upon us.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2011/may/03/news/la-heb-salt-cardiovascular-disease-05032011

  • Dr. 9

    As i’ve said many times, NYC’s limp-wristed little Fascist mayor is a very dangerous person. With his mega-Billions, and the authority of the office he “illegally” holds, he forces his will on everyone, except gays of course. If he doesn’t like it, then you can’t do it. And if he can’t make it illegal, then he’ll tax you into submission.

    He uses his personal Gestapo, (a.k.a. NYC Health Dept.) to force people to live as he says they must. Life in NYC has never been as expensive, nor as oppressive, as it has become under the rule of this tyrant. He would have made a perfect righthand-man for Hitler.

  • A. Levy

    If you are not smart enough to understand that “all things in moderation” is always the sensible choice, then you deserve to be treated like a mindless sheep, which is exactly what Bloomberg does.

    BTW, he’s also the nations #1 anti-Second Amendment zealot.

  • StanInTexas

    About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet.
    And once we get this rammed through, we’ll just change the amount “recommended” AGAIN!

    Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1,200 mg per day on average could save up to $20 billion a year in medical costs.
    And we want to do this, even thought there is no possible way we can prove or justify these numbers. But HEY, they believed Al Gore when he said the polar ice would melt in a decade. Of course, he said that 15 years ago!

    Improving data collection on sodium, including the amount of sodium people consume, and their knowledge, behaviors and health outcomes.
    And now that we have the crisis identified, we can step in a spy on people and control their lives.

    And to think there are Liberals that would gleefully support this.

  • Sam Adams

    “lao says:
    February 8, 2012 at 8:39 am

    Meanwhile, back with the link:

    Americans eat on average about 3,300 mg of sodium a day. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg a day, and about 6 out of 10 adults should further limit sodium to 1,500 mg a day.”

    So what? Who cares?

    My pursuit of happiness is an unalienable right. I eat salt because it makes food taste better. If I add too much for good health, why is that any concern of yours or the government? Am I a cog in the machine that must be kept working and productive so that I can support all those who sit at home collecting their government check and cheese?

    So what if I die at 65 instead of 85? Why is that your concern?

  • kiplingsburdens

    Replace Britain with the US, Hitler with Bloomberg, Obama or any other of our “leaders” and this speech is as pertinent now as it was during the Battle of Britain.

    Winston Churchill: “What General Weygand called the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilization. upon it depends our own British life and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us now. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age, made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will say, “This was their finest hour.”

  • lao

    We shall fight them in the bakeries.
    We shall fight them in the pizzerias.
    We shall fight them in restaurants, cafes and bistros.
    We shall fight them in our homes at breakfast, lunch, dinner and midnight snacks.
    We shall salt our bread, our meat, our soup and our margarita glasses.
    We shall never surrender.

  • lao
  • Sam Adams

    So, Lao, what is the government’s justification for attempting to regulate the amount of salt I eat?

  • lao
  • Graycat

    Okay, a bit off topic, but it’s still a war. Like most wars, it started out as a battle. The city czars in San Franfreakshow have expanded the ban on plastic bags from grocery stores to just about every retailer–gift shops, hardare/home improvement stores, clothing stores–even food establishments have been banned from providing customers with bags for take out orders. How the hell are you supposed to get your food from the restuarant to your car, home or workplace? There are few exemptions that hardly qualify being worthwhile. People are still allowed to bring their dry cleaned clothes home using the time honored dry cleaning plastic covering. Bulk nails and candy purchased in bulk are exempt from the bag ban. If you are foolhardy enough to not to supply your own bags, they ban be purchased for a dime each. Now that brings whole to meaning to “dime bag.”

    more ham-fisted utopian statism here:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505245_162-57373019/san-francisco-expands-plastic-bag-ban/

  • Sam Adams

    Lao……….waiting……..

  • lao
  • lao
  • dan

    Read the ingredient label on your container of salt….
    that’s right, SUGAR

  • Mr Evilwrench

    And the US dietary guidelines are backed by exactly what science? The same science that brings us the BMI and the pyramid? Or maybe the agenda of some politburo hacks? Hey, I don’t really like salt much myself, so I’m pretty much below, but this one size fits all crap results in insane regulations.

  • lao
  • lao

    Well sammy, the justification is right there in the header.

    • Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1,200 mg per day on average could save up to $20 billion a year in medical costs.

  • Beef

    When the government is paying for healthcare, then anything that reduces healthcare costs will be mandatory.

    The infantalized citizenry canot be trusted to wield their own salt shakers. Eventually, Nanny will have to feed us with a spoon, it’s the only cost-effective solution.

  • Winston Smith

    Mao Lao, $20 billion is a completely made up number. Someone else could claim its $30 billion. I thought sugar was the problem last week (as the need for it be regulated as a toxin was claimed to be causing death and high medical cost).

    Someone should jam a can of Morton Salt into your cry hole and cake hole so for once you can make sense.

  • Sam Adams

    “lao says:
    February 8, 2012 at 9:36 am

    Well sammy, the justification is right there in the header.

    • Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1,200 mg per day on average could save up to $20 billion a year in medical costs.”

    Save who? The insurance companies? The government?

    That is like saying that a 55 mph speed limit will save $20 billion dollars in fuel costs per year. While that may be true, why is it any concern of the government? Where in the constitution is the federal government given authority to try and save the peoples’ money?

  • A. Levy

    The three branches of our federal government are no longer bound by the Constitution as the framers envisioned and what is worse is American ignorance and acceptance of such rogue behavior. Look at the current debate over government involvement in health, business bailouts and stimulus packages. The debate centers around questions as whether such involvement is a good idea or a bad idea and whether one program is more costly than another. Those questions are entirely irrelevant to what should be debated, namely: Is such government involvement in our lives permissible under the U.S. Constitution?”… –- Walter Williams

  • Tommy O’Brien

    The same science that brings us the BMI and the pyramid?

    Nothing wrong with BMI. Some guy found in the past that those between 20 and 25 did not need to be screened for some things so Insurance companies could use it to cut down on certain tests when people were seeking insurance. Wanting it to be used for what it is not designed for is stupid.

  • Sam Adams

    Lao apparently has left the building. Wouldn’t he whine if the shoe was on the other foot….such as if George Bush was forcing him to do something he didn’t want…..like support the Patriot Act, for example.

  • son of a preacher man

    Sam Adams,

    “Part of the “Golden Rule” specifically, “He who has the gold makes the rules.” When the government pays your health care costs, then they are no longer your Uncle but your Father, and Father knows best.”

    I agree with what you are saying but you should use Nanny or Mommy instead of Father.

    Etymologically speaking the “patri” in patriot as well as in patriarch means father.

    What we have in our government is more Matriarchal. Mommy is always standing by to take care of you. (que “Mother” by Pink Floyd)

  • StanInTexas

    Sam,

    WOULD?? He did, and continues to do so. Do not look for a consistent train of thought from such a blatent hypocrite as LoaZee!

  • Ghost of FA Hayek

    • Reducing the sodium Americans eat by 1,200 mg per day on average could save up to $20 billion a year in medical costs.
    Lao
    And here I was, under the assumption that Obamacare would NOT lead to controls over what we eat.
    The FDA has already begun the process
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/04/20/us-salt-fda-idUSTRE63J0JN20100420
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nk_HPs34usU

  • lao

    sammy compares recommendations on salt intake with the patriot act – love it.

  • Sam Adams

    “lao says:
    February 8, 2012 at 10:26 am

    sammy compares recommendations on salt intake with the patriot act – love it.”

    Indeed I do. Both are an affront to freedom. Both were/will be passed/supported by “progressives” who always know best. And apparently both are supported by you and your party of choice. (Remember how Obama preached against the Patriot Act, just like he preached that he would close Gitmo?).

    Remember, it was the progressives who gave us prohibition. They still haven’t learned a damn thing (except to use more science to support their tyranny).

  • Sam Adams

    Per Ghost:
    “U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro and Senator Tom Harkin said on a conference call they would pressure the FDA to regulate salt intake in the U.S. food supply.

    “My view of self regulation is that it has not worked in the past,” DeLauro said. “We need to move this along.”

    Where in the US Constitution does it give the federal government the right to regulate the food we eat?

  • Sam Adams

    Sorry, Lao; I’ve got to get to my next job. Hope you can tear yourself away from the X-Box and provide a reasonable response while I am away.

  • AC

    How long before we start seeing Mexican pilots land their twin engine Pipers out in the deserts, cargo packed full of Morton’s by the kilo?

    Mr. Morton will have quite the nice ranch in Cochabamba by the time this is all over.

  • AC
  • TED
  • Sam Adams

    Better start building a fence around the Great Salt Lake. A couple of gallons of lake water, some sunlight and time and pretty soon you’ve got some real salt available for sale……

    Not a lot more difficult that growing weed.

  • Sinister66

    There have been health warnings against salt for as long as I can remember. I think back then people were saying,”What a bunch of crap. Next thing you know they will be saying cigarettes are bad for me to”.

    I believe the warnings are real but government has no business in a persons personal life, including how much salt they put on their food.

  • Sue

    Why do New Yorker’s put up with it? That is the bigger question? WHY WHY WHY? Have they been totally emasculated. Who in their right mind would put up with this idiocy? Sorry, I live in VA. Can’t imagine it happening here.

  • hiram

    hmmmm…. 3,000mg is 3 grams… let’s call it 3 grams per day on top of what’s naturally in food or added to processed stuff… about a kilo or 2.2 pounds a year, plus a little… call it 2 1/2 pounds a year to simplify the math & allow for spillage… take into account my age, family history…

    Yep. 50lbs of salt should be enough to get me through the rest of my natural life.

    http://www.saltworks.us/shop/product.asp?idProduct=978

    $63.25 for a lifetime’s worth of the ‘gourmet sheeit’, including shipping! Stuff it, Nanny-staters.

  • Bad Barry
  • lao

    Sometime in the future…

    (Hiram’s son) “Ok, I know this is tough but now that he’s gone we gotta go through dad’s stuff in the basement.”

    (Hiram’s son’s wife) “This whole corner is full of ammo but ew, I found a case of condoms underneath, they are Massachusetts MInis!”

    (Hiram’s son) (laughs) Dad was hardly a boy scout but “Be Prepared” was his motto.” (shifts a bunch of boxes of obsolete light bulbs) “What the…? There’s gotta be 50 pounds of SALT in this box!”

    (Hiram’s son’s wife) “Did he use it for melting ice?”

    (Hiram’s son) (shrugs) “He hated slugs.”

    (Hiram’s son’s wife) “You don’t think…I mean…we DID find him at the dinner table with his face in his plate and three salt shakers sitting there.”

  • Sam Adams

    And where, Lao, does the federal government derive the power to legislate salt intake? Which of the enumerated powers does that fall under?

  • grayjohn

    New York City soon to be known as Goiter Town USA.

  • Ummah Gummah

    Beef says:
    February 8, 2012 at 9:45 am
    When the government is paying for healthcare, then anything that reduces healthcare costs will be mandatory.

    The infantalized citizenry canot be trusted to wield their own salt shakers. Eventually, Nanny will have to feed us with a spoon, it’s the only cost-effective solution.

    Hence, DEATH PANELS will be logical, since they reduce costs.

    .

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