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Nov 25 2019

Academics Confirm Welfare Draws Immigrants

Does welfare draw vast numbers of unproductive people from the Third World, who then proceed to bloat welfare rolls? There are two ways to answer this crucial question: (1) apply common sense, which instantly produces the answer, “Yes, obviously”; or (2) pay academics to pull on their chins and conduct a study, which eventually produces the answer, “Yes, obviously.”

From a translation at Gates of Vienna of an article in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung:

Many refugees only make their way to Europe because they know that they can collect lavish social benefits here. This thesis is particularly persistent in the immigration debate — but this so-called “pull effect” of the welfare state is controversial in research.

It is controversial because some leftists fear that if they admitted they are forcing people to finance their own displacement, resistance could arise.

A group of researchers led by Princeton economist Henrik Kleven now counters this skepticism about the pull of a strong welfare state with hard figures from Denmark: According to the figures, there have been significantly fewer immigrants from countries outside the EU every year since the Danish government cut benefits specifically for migrants from this group.

Denmark goes back and forth on generous welfare benefits to immigrants, depending on whether the center-right or center-left is in power.

The effect the researchers found in the data was large. With the reduction in social benefits for non-EU nationals in 2002, net immigration from this immigrant group decreased by 5,000 persons per year compared to average annual migration movements before the change in the law. And that’s not all: when the centre-left government reversed the law, immigration figures from the affected group of countries immediately rose again — to almost the same level as before.

Fortunately, the center-right got back in and restored the welfare cuts.

Five thousand per year is a significant number when you consider that the population of Denmark is smaller than that of greater Houston (5.77 million vs 6.16 million). Plus, many of the immigrants who were already there sponging probably left for greener pastures when the benefits went down.

Tightening family reunification rules had a similar effect, causing immigrants in Denmark to move on to Sweden. Once again, the canary in coalmine of moonbattery loses.

On a tip from Dragon’s Lair.




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