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Sep 14 2018

Deshawn Patton Demonstrates Why Your Car Is Not Safe in San Francisco

Auto burglaries in San Francisco are out of control. No one dares leave anything of value in their car. The story of 21-year-old Deshawn Patton illustrates why this might become such a serious problem in a city run by moonbats.

After a year-long crime spree that occurred while he was already on two separate probations for a previous car break-in and for a felony burglary, Patton was indicted on 11 felony and nine misdemeanor charges, which include eight counts of auto burglary and one of hit and run causing injury. Young Deshawn was caught in the act multiple times, but he usually managed to escape, employing tactics such as ramming a police car with officers in it.

No doubt he is a nice boy who plans to go back to school and maybe also become rap star.

So Superior Court Judge Christopher Hite will let him off easy.

Regarding the judge,

Hite is perhaps best known for flushing all 64,713 outstanding warrants issued in quality-of-life cases from January 2011 through October 2015, giving police no authority to detain people who skipped court appearances and rendering the citations meaningless.

The judge is a moonbat. Incidentally, he is also a Person of Politically Preferred Pigmentation, like young Master Patton.

Patton agreed to plead guilty to most of the grand jury charges, and Hite indicated he will put him on probation and release him…

Probation doesn’t seem to work on Deshawn. This time is unlikely to be different. We will probably never know, because only 1.6% of reported car burglaries result in arrest.

The deal isn’t final. Outraged members of the public keep showing up at the hearings, and Hite keeps kicking the hearings back. The next one is scheduled for October 3. Patton will almost certainly walk free.

Patton mainly preys on the rental cars of tourists. No wonder tourists and conventions are learning to stay away from San Francisco.

On a tip from Dave.




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