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Apr 12 2020

Harvard to Hold Anti-Homeschooling Summit

The Nazis are said to be the first to ban homeschooling (it remains illegal in Germany to this day). Harvard would like the USA to follow suit, and for the same reason. Homeschooling disrupts the uniformity of thought that social engineers attempt to impose through public schools.

This June, Harvard will host “Homeschooling Summit: Problems, Politics, and Prospects for Reform.” Participants will discuss the “problems of educational deprivation and child maltreatment that too often occur under the guise of homeschooling.”

Elizabeth Bartholet of Harvard Law is a speaker and co-organizer. She has described homeschooling as a threat to society. She writes:

Many homeschool precisely because they want to isolate their children from ideas and values central to our democracy. Many promote racial segregation and female subservience. Many question science.

Coming from an Ivy League ideologue, the phrase “ideas and values central to our democracy” might mean the same thing a regular American would mean by “loony tunes moonbattery.” “Female subservience” translates to “deviation from radical feminist dogma.” To “question science” is to question liberal doctrine — i.e., to deny that there are 58 genders, that men can menstruate, that email causes global warming, et cetera.

Bartholet continues:

This article calls for a radical transformation in the homeschooling regime, and a related rethinking of child rights and reframing of constitutional doctrine. It recommends a presumptive ban on homeschooling, with the burden on parents to demonstrate justification for permission to homeschool.

Advancing this viewpoint appears to be the objective of the Homeschooling Summit.

Another speaker and co-organizer is James Dwyer of William and Mary School of law, who holds that “fundamentalist Christian and Catholic schools may be damaging to children,” ironically accusing them of the “instilling of dogmatic and intolerant attitudes.”

One size fits all when it comes to education, according to the Harvard elite.

This viewpoint contrasts sharply with an upbeat 2018 profile in the Harvard Gazette of three high-achieving Harvard students who were homeschooled. Where’s Winston Smith when you need something stuffed down the memory hole?

Others who were homeschooled include Alexander Graham Bell, Pierre Curie, and Thomas Edison. Geniuses like these would be bored out of their minds in schools devoted to producing equal outcomes. But you can’t have both equity and genius.

You can’t have both universal compulsory brainwashing and genius either.

On tips from Henry B.



3 Responses to “Harvard to Hold Anti-Homeschooling Summit”

  1. […] Harvard to Hold Anti-Homeschooling Summit The Nazis are said to be the first to ban homeschooling (it remains illegal in Germany to this day). Harvard would like the USA to follow suit, and for the same reason. Homeschooling disrupts the uniformity of thought that social engineers attempt to impose through public schools. […]

  2. […] when it was less myopically devoted to advancing the progressive agenda, Harvard University aggressively opposes homeschooling. Whatever students learn at Harvard these days, it won’t include these facts about […]


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