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Nov 06 2019

How Criminals Get Housing Priority

To find housing in a congested dystopia like New York City, it helps to be a member of a politically privileged group. That way, you will be given priority over regular people so as to avoid an extravagant lawsuit. For example, it helps to have a criminal record.

From the Daily News:

A Queens landlord has agreed to pay [over] $1 million for wrongly refusing to rent apartments to people who were previously incarcerated.

The primary victim is the Sand Castle apartment complex in Far Rockaway. Secondary victims are the other residents, who probably don’t want to deal with criminals any more than landlords do.

The shakedown was inflicted by the nonprofit Fortune Society, a champion of criminals who have been let out of jail.

“This settlement fires a warning shot across the bow of any landlord in America who blanketly refuses to rent apartments to people with criminal justice involvement,” Fortune Society CEO JoAnne Page said in a release announcing the deal.

“People with criminal justice involvement” is liberalese for “criminals.” Update your copy of the Newspeak Dictionary as necessary. The phrase “blanketly refuses to rent apartments to” would more accurately read “fails to give top priority to.” Few landlords can risk social justice lawyers like the Fortune Society dragging them into court for a looting.

The society charged that Sand Castle violated the federal Fair Housing Act through the ban on ex-cons, which they said disproportionately affected black and Hispanic people.

Not trusting ex-cons to pay their rent or to refrain from mugging the other tenants is racist and therefore forbidden.

Astonishing rhetoric from sanctimonious Fortune Society lawyer John Relman:

“When housing providers deny basic rights to those who have been formerly incarcerated, they are imposing harsh limitations on where these individuals can live and [quack quack quack].”

Basic rights would be nice. The basic rights of freedom of association and to enter into contractual arrangements on a voluntary basis have been abolished in the name of moonbattery. This imposes harsh limitations on how the law-abiding can live. But who cares about the law-abiding in a liberal bastion like New York City?

On a tip from Sean C.




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