moonbattery logo

Jun 08 2020

Systemic Racism in Law Enforcement Does Not Exist

It has all been for nothing: the chaos, the violence, the businesses and whole neighborhoods destroyed, the lives ruined, the hatred evoked, the monuments desecrated, the buildings burned. The “systemic racism” in law enforcement that gullible protesters believe they are protesting against does not exist.

Heather Mac Donald presents the facts:

In 2019 police officers fatally shot 1,004 people, most of whom were armed or otherwise dangerous. African-Americans were about a quarter of those killed by cops last year (235), a ratio that has remained stable since 2015. That share of black victims is less than what the black crime rate would predict, since police shootings are a function of how often officers encounter armed and violent suspects. In 2018, the latest year for which such data have been published, African-Americans made up 53% of known homicide offenders in the U.S. and commit about 60% of robberies, though they are 13% of the population.

That is, if there is any racial bias regarding police violence, it is in favor of blacks, not against them. This is hardly counterintuitive, considering the extreme political consequences of employing violence to control black criminals like George Floyd.

The police fatally shot nine unarmed blacks and 19 unarmed whites in 2019, according to a Washington Post database, down from 38 and 32, respectively, in 2015. The Post defines “unarmed” broadly to include such cases as a suspect in Newark, N.J., who had a loaded handgun in his car during a police chase. In 2018 there were 7,407 black homicide victims. Assuming a comparable number of victims last year, those nine unarmed black victims of police shootings represent 0.1% of all African-Americans killed in 2019. By contrast, a police officer is 18½ times more likely to be killed by a black male than an unarmed black male is to be killed by a police officer.

Yet we don’t see any protesters waving thin blue line flags. This is not because no one appreciates the police, but because people know that a public show of support for law enforcement in the current climate would result in violence and possibly death.

The latest in a series of studies undercutting the claim of systemic police bias was published in August 2019 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The researchers found that the more frequently officers encounter violent suspects from any given racial group, the greater the chance that a member of that group will be fatally shot by a police officer. There is “no significant evidence of antiblack disparity in the likelihood of being fatally shot by police,” they concluded.

The protests/riots have nothing to do with factual reality. They have only to do with politics — more specifically, with achieving power through revolutionary means.

On a tip from Varla.



7 Responses to “Systemic Racism in Law Enforcement Does Not Exist”

  1. […] The crybully Black Lives Matter ideology endorsed by the entire liberal establishment is as much a scam as the Russian collusion hoax. Systemic racism in law enforcement does not exist. […]

  2. […] issue of “systemic racism” in law enforcement is completely bogus, but it has worked wonderfully for leftists as a device to set us at each other’s throats. […]

  3. […] surface narrative of the “protests” is a farce. Systemic racism in law enforcement does not even exist. The Left’s pretexts are irrelevant. What we are witnessing is cultural genocide against […]

  4. […] out of reach make any difference even if it were real. But then, systemic racism in law enforcement does not exist either; nor would allowing black supremacists to riot and loot be helpful if it did. A crisis does […]

  5. […] out of reach make any difference even if it were real. But then, systemic racism in law enforcement does not exist either; nor would allowing black supremacists to riot and loot be helpful if it did. A crisis does […]

  6. […] in confrontations with the police, it is because they are vastly more likely to commit crimes. As Heather Mac Donald has documented, when the stats are adjusted for crime rate, police are more likely to inflict […]

  7. […] in confrontations with the police, it is because they are vastly more likely to commit crimes. As Heather Mac Donald has documented, when the stats are adjusted for crime rate, police are more likely to inflict […]


Alibi3col theme by Themocracy